Archive for the ‘Snowmobile’ Category

Snowmobile Wins Again – Claims of Injured Ski Racer Survive Motion Based on Waiver and Assumption of Risk Statutes (CO)

October 29, 2015

Schlumbrecht-Muniz v. Steamboat Ski and Resort Corp. (Colorado)
(trial court disposition)

Plaintiff was a member of the Sarasota, Florida Ski Team.  She traveled to the Steamboat Springs Ski Resort in Colorado to participate in ski races.  After finishing her second race and exiting the race course, plaintiff skied down a trail and headed toward the ski lift.  She attempted to ski past the lift to a picnic area to meet up with other racers.  However, she collided with a snowmobile that was parked near the lift.  Plaintiff sued the ski resort alleging (1) common law negligence in parking the snowmobile in a dangerous, high-traffic area, and (2) negligence per se under the Colorado Ski Safety Act (“SSA”) by failing to mark and pad the snowmobile.

The defendant moved for summary judgment, arguing (1) that the exculpatory clause contained in the race participation agreement signed by the plaintiff prior to her participation barred the plaintiff’s claims, (2) the common law negligence claim was barred by the SSA (“no skier may make any claim against or recover from any ski area operator for injury resulting from any of the inherent dangers and risks of skiing”), and (3) the negligence per se claim failed because the SSA does not apply under the circumstances (i.e., with regard to a parked snowmobile).

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Out in the Cold – Claim for Injury to Snowmobiler Barred by Recreational Immunity Statute (OR)

July 31, 2015

Stringer v. U.S. Department of Agriculture (Oregon)
(trial court disposition)

A snowmobiler was injured in a national forest when he drove off an embankment.  He filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Forest Service under the Federal Tort Claims Act.  The Forest Service moved to dismiss the claim.  The U.S. District Court ruled that the Forest Service was entitled to statutory immunity.

The Court noted that as stated in the Oregon statutes, “it is the public policy of the State of Oregon to encourage owners of land to make their land available to the public for recreational purposes … by limiting their liability toward persons entering thereon for such purposes….” (citation omitted) advances this policy by granting “immunity to landowners who open their land to the public for recreational purposes.”  Referring to one of the exceptions to the immunity, the plaintiff argued that the Forest Service had waived the immunity by charging a fee for use of its lands.  Specifically, plaintiff cited that the Forest Service charged third parties for camping fees and ski-lift fees within the forest lands.  However, the Court disagreed, explaining “The Deschutes National Forest comprises approximately 1.8 million acres of land, including three independent ranger districts. (citation omitted)  A fee charged at one end of the Deschutes National Forest cannot, as a matter of public policy, waive immunity at the other end of the same forest, thousands of miles away, simply because the government made a charge.”

Skier v. Snowmobile

May 19, 2009

Robinette v. Snowmass Ski Area (Colorado)
(Federal District Court Rules in Favor of Ski Resort in a Collision Case Based Upon Release)

The Aspen Daily News published an article today discussing the recent decision of a U.S. District Court Judge in Denver Colorado. The article can be found here: http://www.aspendailynews.com/section/home/134580

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