Archive for the ‘Fairs & Festivals’ Category

A Trip to the Festival – Woman Injured from Exposed Pipe on Unpaved Walkway to a Parking Lot; Issues of Fact for the Jury (FL)

August 21, 2015

Cook v. Bay Area Renaissance Festival of Largo, Inc. (Florida)

Plaintiff attended a festival organized by the defendant, and she tripped and fell over an exposed pipe on an unpaved walkway connecting the festival grounds to an overflow parking lot.  Plaintiff filed an action action against the organizer, contending that it negligently maintained the property where the incident occurred.  The defendant filed a motion for summary judgment, arguing that there was no proof that it had control over the premises where the incident occurred.  Although plaintiff was directed by festival volunteers to park in the overflow parking, there was conflicting testimony concerning whether the volunteers directed her to use the unpaved walkway.  The trial court granted the defendant’s motion, and the plaintiff appealed.

On appeal, the District Court of Appeal of Florida reversed the decision and remanded the matter for further proceedings.  First, the Court held that there was a genuine issue of material fact as to whether the organizer had exercised control of the unpaved area.  The Court stated “[a] party ‘who assumes control over the premises in question, no matter under what guise, assumes also the duty to keep them in repair.'”  The defendant was clearly using the overflow parking, and there was conflicting evidence as to whether the defendant intended its invitees to use the unpaved walkway.  The Court also noted that the evidence showed that the defendant took action to remove the pipe from the area after the incident.  Such evidence suggested the defendant’s control over the premises.

Second, the Court held there was also a genuine issue of material fact as to whether the pipe was a dangerous condition, and whether warnings from the plaintiff’s husband and other attendees were sufficient to absolve the defendant from liability.  The defendant argued that the pipe was “open and obvious,” such that it did not owe her a duty to warn her about the hazard.  However, the Court explained that “even when a hazard is open and obvious, a landowner or possessor can still be held liable for failing ‘to exercise reasonable care to prevent foreseeable injury’ to invitees.”

 

Don’t Believe the Type – No Liability Coverage for Event Production Company Despite Contrary Insurance Certificate (LA)

August 4, 2015

Daniels v. SMG Crystal, LLC (Louisiana)

This case revolves around the 2005 Essence Festival held at the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans. An attendee of the event slipped and fell on an unknown substance at the Superdome, suffering personal injury.  She filed a lawsuit against government entities, the Superdome manager, the festival organizer, and a production company hired by the organizer to produce the festival.  The government entities and the Superdome manager filed cross-complaints against the festival organizer and the production company seeking defense and indemnity protection.  The organizer filed a cross complaint against the production company and its commercial general liability (“CGL”) insurer.  The insurer eventually filed a motion for summary judgment on the grounds that it did not owe a duty to defend or indemnify any of the parties under the CGL policy.  The District Court initially denied the motion, but later granted the insurer’s motion for a new trial and for summary judgment.  Appeals followed.  On appeal, the Court of Appeal of Louisiana vacated the District Court decision and remanded the matter.  On remand, the District Court granted the insurer’s motion for summary judgment against the injured attendee and the production company on the issue of insurance coverage, and it dismissed all the claims against the insurer.  The production company appealed again. (more…)

Show’s Over – Indemnity Dispute Between State Fair and Equipment Lessor Regarding Collapsed Stage Continues (IN)

May 29, 2015

In re Indiana State Fair Litigation (Indiana)
(one Judge dissenting)

This case arises from a collapsed stage at a state fair in August of 2011, which caused several deaths and injuries.  The issue was whether the stage equipment supplier (Mid-America Sound [“Mid-America”]) was entitled to indemnification from the event operator (the Indiana State Fair Commission [“Commission”]) based on the terms and conditions of the typical course of business between them.

Dating back to the mid-1990s, the Commission leased temporary roof structures and other equipment from Mid-America to use for outdoor concerts on property operated by the Commission.  During the last ten years of their relationship, the parties followed the same procedure with regard to the equipment leasing.  Mid-America delivered the equipment before the event and then later returned to pick up the equipment after the event.  When it picked up the equipment, Mid-America would sign contracts for the rented items and submit the contracts to the Commission.  The Commission audited each contract to make sure it conformed to the agreement of the parties and then issued payment.

(more…)

Big Bag of Beads – New Orleans Krewe Not Liable for Injury to Parade Attendee (LA)

May 18, 2015

Citron v. Gentilly Carnival Club Inc. (Louisiana)

The plaintiff was a long time member the defendant Endymion Krewe, a carnival organization that hosted parades and events in New Orleans.  Her and her husband attended a parade and extravaganza event hosted by Endymion.  When the parade was making its loop through the Superdome, plaintiff was hit in the head by a bag of beads.  She received first aid treatment on site, and was then transported to a local hospital.

Plaintiff filed a lawsuit against the Endymion Krewe, alleging that it was liable both in its capacity as a organization and vicariously for its krewe member’s actions.  Plaintiff alleged that her injuries were caused by the “deliberate and wanton act or gross negligence” of the defendant, and that the defendant “willfully and knowingly permit its members to throw full bags of beads overhand in a space where people are seated, eating and enjoying musical entertainment.”  Plaintiff also asserted that because the defendant required its float “riders to be masked making identification of the individual tortfeasor impossible,” the defendant “must be liable for the conduct of its members.”

Defendant argued that each member of the Endymion Krewe received two tickets to enter into the subject extravaganza, and the tickets had a limitation of liability and assumption of risk printed on the back.  Defendant also asserted the affirmative defenses of comparative fault on the part of plaintiff (or third parties) and immunity for liability under the Mardi Gras immunity statute (La. R.S. 9:2796).  The statute, which was first enacted in 1979 to help control rising insurance costs for parading organizations, provides broad immunity for krewes that sponsor parades, and it provides that anyone who attends such a parade “assumes the risk of being struck by any missile whatsoever which has been traditionally thrown, tossed or hurled by members.”  The krewe bears the initial burden of providing evidence to establish its right to immunity under the statute.  Once established, the burden then shifts to the claimant to establish that the krewe engaged in gross negligence (an exception to the immunity).

(more…)

Deflated

October 1, 2012

Interstate Fire & Casualty v. Abernathy (Florida)
(A minor festival attendee was injured while using an inflatable bungee run; the mother of the minor sued the club that was hosting the event; after settling with the club for millions of dollars and obtaining a judgment, the mother then filed an action against the club’s insurer for failing to provide coverage and for engaging in bad faith; the court ruled that the coverage did not extend back four days to liability for the prior known injury.)

Interstate Fire & Casualty appealed a final judgment against it awarding the injured minor more than six million dollars.  The trial court had determined that a certificate of insurance that was issued by a broker on April 18, 2007 conferred coverage on a purported additional insured (the club hosting the festival) for liability for the minor’s injury that occurred four days earlier on April 14, 2007.

(more…)