Archive for the ‘Control’ Category

Out of Control? – Woman Injured by Display at Conference Wins Jury Verdict; Evidence Properly Excluded at Trial (MO)

September 1, 2015

Medley v. Joyce Meyer Ministries, Inc. (Missouri)

The plaintiff attended a conference that was hosted by the defendant, and she was injured when she tripped over a window display set up in a boutique vendor area at the conference.  Plaintiff filed an action against the defendant for premises liability, alleging (1) that she was an invitee of the defendant, (2) the defendant controlled (or had the right to control) the boutique area that included the display, (3) the defendant negligently placed the window display in a crowded and congested area, and (4) plaintiff suffered injuries and damages as a result of the defendant’s negligence.

During trial, the defendant attempted to introduce documentary evidence, including a license agreement, between the defendant and the St. Louis Convention and Visitors Commission (“CVC”) showing CVC’s involvement in the conference.  Plaintiff objected to the evidence  as irrelevant, and the trial court sustained the objections.  Defendant also sought to introduce witness testimony about CVC’s involvement in the conference and CVC’s relationship with the defendant.  However, the trial court held: “(1) there was no evidence to suggest that Defendant was not in possession of the premises where Plaintiff’s injury occurred; (2) the only relevant relationship in the case was the relationship between Plaintiff and Defendant; and (3) the evidence presented by Defendant in its offer of proof was not relevant.”  Thereafter, the defendant sought the introduction of a jury instruction that stated: “Your verdict must be for [D]efendant if you believe that [D]efendant was not in possession or control of the premises.” However, the trial court refused to submit the instruction.

Upon the conclusion of the trial, the jury entered a verdict in favor of the plaintiff, finding that plaintiff’s total damages were $400,000.  The verdict assessed defendant seventy percent at fault and plaintiff thirty percent at fault, thereby awarding plaintiff $280,000 in damages.  The court entered a judgment consistent with the verdict, and defendant filed a motion for a new trial.  The motion was denied, and the defendant appealed. (more…)

A Trip to the Festival – Woman Injured from Exposed Pipe on Unpaved Walkway to a Parking Lot; Issues of Fact for the Jury (FL)

August 21, 2015

Cook v. Bay Area Renaissance Festival of Largo, Inc. (Florida)

Plaintiff attended a festival organized by the defendant, and she tripped and fell over an exposed pipe on an unpaved walkway connecting the festival grounds to an overflow parking lot.  Plaintiff filed an action action against the organizer, contending that it negligently maintained the property where the incident occurred.  The defendant filed a motion for summary judgment, arguing that there was no proof that it had control over the premises where the incident occurred.  Although plaintiff was directed by festival volunteers to park in the overflow parking, there was conflicting testimony concerning whether the volunteers directed her to use the unpaved walkway.  The trial court granted the defendant’s motion, and the plaintiff appealed.

On appeal, the District Court of Appeal of Florida reversed the decision and remanded the matter for further proceedings.  First, the Court held that there was a genuine issue of material fact as to whether the organizer had exercised control of the unpaved area.  The Court stated “[a] party ‘who assumes control over the premises in question, no matter under what guise, assumes also the duty to keep them in repair.'”  The defendant was clearly using the overflow parking, and there was conflicting evidence as to whether the defendant intended its invitees to use the unpaved walkway.  The Court also noted that the evidence showed that the defendant took action to remove the pipe from the area after the incident.  Such evidence suggested the defendant’s control over the premises.

Second, the Court held there was also a genuine issue of material fact as to whether the pipe was a dangerous condition, and whether warnings from the plaintiff’s husband and other attendees were sufficient to absolve the defendant from liability.  The defendant argued that the pipe was “open and obvious,” such that it did not owe her a duty to warn her about the hazard.  However, the Court explained that “even when a hazard is open and obvious, a landowner or possessor can still be held liable for failing ‘to exercise reasonable care to prevent foreseeable injury’ to invitees.”

 

On the Rocks – Woman Injury Jumping Off Rock in the Ocean; Liability is an Issue for the Jury (MA)

July 29, 2015

Cohen v. Elephant Rock Beach Club, Inc. (Massachusetts)
(trial court disposition)

he plaintiff was a guest at the defendant’s beach club.  During her stay, plaintiff saw guests swimming to and around, and jumping off of, a large rock that was 250 feet off the shore.  She decided that she wanted to go to the rock, and did so by walking from the beach to the water and swimming to the rock.  After watching adults and children take a running start and then jump off the highest part of the rock, plaintiff waited her turn and did the same thing.  After she jumped, her foot smashed into a portion of the rock below the surface of the water, resulting in a compound fracture of plaintiff’s leg.  Lifeguards from the defendant that were on duty noticed plaintiff after she hit the water and went to assist her.

Plaintiff filed a complaint alleging negligence based on premises liability, and a duty to warn her of the dangerous condition of the rock.  The defendant club filed a motion for summary judgment.  In support of its motion, the defendant filed a late supplemental expert witness report, and the plaintiff filed a motion to strike the report.  As to the motion to strike, the U.S. District Court denied the motion, finding that the untimely disclosure of the supplemental report was harmless.

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