Archive for the ‘Basketball’ Category

Failure to Warn – Supreme Court Find Triable Issue Regarding School District’s Breach of Duty to Deceased Youth (WY)

October 21, 2015

Amos v. Lincoln County School District No. 2 (Wyoming)

A five-year-old boy was attending a basketball game at a school that had been converted to a community center.  He was playing with other children on a stage near the basketball court when a lunchroom bench tipped over and fell on top of him, causing a basal skull fracture and killing him instantly.  The lunchroom bench had been removed from the gymnasium wall and had been placed against the wall in a storage room adjacent to the stage.  A year later, the boy’s personal representative filed a wrongful death action against the school district, along with the town and county where the facility was located.

The county filed an “affidavit of noninvolvement” with the trial court in lieu of an answer.  In response, the trial court entered an order dismissing the county from the action without prejudice.  The court explained that it found that “there [were] not enough facts to show that [the county was] responsible but if facts come forward or are discovered that show that [the county was] responsible, either directly or indirectly, [the county] shall be reinstated as a Defendant.”

The school district filed a motion for summary judgment, arguing that it had turned over possession and maintenance of the building to the community group such that it did not owe the plaintiff a duty of care and was, therefore, entitled to judgment as a matter of law.  The trial court denied the school district’s motion, holding: “Viewing these basic facts in a light most favorable to the Plaintiff, the School District, as the owner, is in the same position as a landlord is to its tenants and their invitees. As such, it owed all persons entering the building as invitees the duty of reasonable and ordinary care under the circumstances.”  Notwithstanding the ruling, the trial court did express concern that the facts may not ultimately establish a breach of the school district’s duty or that the district’s actions were the proximate cause of the incident.

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Foul on the Defense – Basketball Rec League Waiver Void Under New York Statute (NY)

June 12, 2015

(photo by Dave Lindblom; unchanged)

Falzone v. City of New York (New York)

Plaintiff paid a fee to register to play in a recreation basketball league.  The league then paid the defendant New York City Department of Eduction a portion of the league registration fees for a permit in order to use a public school gymnasium.  During a game at the facility, the plaintiff was injured when his hand went through the glass window of a door that was behind one of the basketball hoops.  Plaintiff then filed an action against the City of New York and the Department of Education.  After initially responding, the defendant filed a motion for leave to amend their answer to add the affirmative defense of release and filed a motion to dismiss the complaint.  The trial court granted both motions and the plaintiff appealed.

On appeal, the Appellate Division of the Supreme Court determined that the trial court had properly granted the City of New York’s motion to dismiss in that it did not operate, maintain, or control the school premises.  As to the motion by the Department of Eduction to add the affirmative defense of release, the Court reversed the decision.  the Court explained that “[a]lthough leave to amend a pleading should be freely given [citation omitted], a court should deny a motion for leave to amend if the proposed amendment is palpably insufficient, would prejudice or surprise the opposing party, or is patently devoid of merit.”  The Court noted that the proposed amendment regarding the affirmative defense of release was “devoid of merit.”  The plaintiff had signed a “Player Waiver, Release of Liability and Indemnification Agreement” prior to his participation in the basketball league, but he paid a league fee to use the gymnasium and the payment of the fee rendered the waiver and release agreement void pursuant to New York General Obligations Law Section 5-326.  Under Section 5-326, every agreement in connection with a place of recreation in which the owner or operator receives a fee for the use of such facilities that exempts the owner or operator from liability for damages resulting from the negligence of the owner or operator is deemed void as against public policy and wholly unenforceable.

Home Court Disadvantage

September 17, 2010

Galaxy Cable, Inc. v. Davis (Alabama)
(11-year-old playing basketball at a friend’s house tripped over a guy wire maintained by a cable company; liability found for the cable company due to a missing yellow cable guard, but lower court’s ruling as to punitive damaged overturned.)

An 11-year-old boy tripped over a guy cable attached to a telephone pole while retrieving a basketball, lacerating his leg. The minor (through his parents) sued the cable company (among others) for creating a dangerous condition and failing to remedy the condition. A plastic yellow guard that wrapped around the guy cable and provided a visible warning of the cable had been moved, and the cable company had failed to replace or fix the condition despite having routinely inspected the pole. The defendant cable company argued that the condition was open and obvious, but the trial court found in favor of the plaintiff, awarding compensatory damages and punitive damages. The defendant appealed, and ultimately the Alabama Supreme Court affirmed the lower court’s ruling of liability, but overturned the determination of punitive damages due to a lack of evidence establishing “wantonness.”

NOTE: Much of the discussion revolves around whether the plaintiff was an invitee on the premises where the incident occurred. The plaintiff was on land belonging to another, which land was the subject of an easement in favor of the defendant. The parties never agreed on plaintiff’s legal status and the court determined that the defendant had waived the issue as to whether it owed the plaintiff a specialized duty at trial.