Iced Out – Claim by Skier Who Lost Control Due to Icy Conditions Barred (PA)

by

Smith-Wille v. Ski Shawnee, Inc. (Pennsylvania)
(trial court disposition)

Plaintiff was skiing at the defendant’s ski resort when she encountered icy conditions, causing her to lose control and run into unpadded PVC piping holding a vinyl fence on the ski slope.  Plaintiff suffered personal injury and filed an action against the resort, claiming that there should have been a warning as to the icy conditions.   The defendant filed a motion for summary judgment, arguing that the accident was the result of the inherent risk of skiing.  In opposition to the motion, plaintiff asserted that there were no warnings of the slope conditions that would have allowed her to decide whether or not to proceed in skiing (i.e., she could not assume a risk of which she was not aware).  Plaintiff stated that “her conduct in skiing down the hill in the icy conditions was not voluntary, and that she could not have assumed the risk of any dangerous conditions on the slopes once there was no way to avoid those conditions, namely the ice.”  Plaintiff further contended that she was not adequately warned or the pole or the fencing that she ran into during the incident.

The Court of Common Pleas of Pennsylvania referred to the Pennsylvania Skiers Responsibility Act (“Act”), which was part of Pennsylvania’s comparative negligence statute.  In the Act, the Pennsylvania General Assembly recognized that there were “inherent” risks in the sport of downhill skiing, although those risks were not defined.  The Court concluded that “ice and icy conditions are part of the ‘inherent risks’ envisioned by the General Assembly.”  As such, the defendant did not owe the plaintiff a duty to protect the plaintiff from those conditions.  The Court also pointed out that “from a practical standpoint . . . it would be virtually impossible for a ski area to warn of icy conditions wherever and wherever they may exist.”  Finally, the Court stated that the defendant did not owe a duty to provide plaintiff with an alternate route down the slope.

The Court granted the motion for summary judgment and entered judgment in favor of the defendant.

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