Wipeout – Sledding Spectator at Birthday Party Assumed risk of Bring Struck (NY)

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Photo by Tony Fischer (no changes made)

 

Savage v. Brown (New York)

The plaintiff was one of about 15 guests invited to a birthday party held for defendant Tracy Brown (“Tracy”).  The guests were invited to participate in snow sledding at the party.  Plaintiff was standing on the side of the hill watching other attendees sledding when she was struck by a sled carrying Tracy and another guest.  Plaintiff sued Tracy, Tracy’s mother, and the property owner for negligence.  The defendants moved for summary judgment based on the doctrine of assumption of the risk.  Alternatively, the property owner contended that it was entitled to protection of the state’s recreational immunity statute.

The trial court denied the defendants’ motions, and the defendants appealed.  The Appellate Division of the Supreme Court reversed the trial court decisions and entered judgment in favor of the defendants.  The Court compared the plaintiff to a spectator at other sporting activities who assume the risk of being struck, such as a spectator at a baseball game.  The Court concluded that by standing on the side of the hill while watching other people sledding, plaintiff assumed the risk of being struck by a sled.”  Plaintiff testified that she knew the sleds were moving very fast, and she had “observed someone else at the party lose control of her sled and crash into a snow bank, and she saw a sled strike another person.”  Plaintiff’s only argument was that “she did not assume the risk of being struck by a sled because she was standing off to the side of the hill in an area where sleds were unlikely to go.”  However, the Court noted that the evidence showed that the sled turned at the very end of the run and that plaintiff did not have any time to react to it.

In light of the Court’s decision based on assumption of risk, the Court noted that it need not address the applicability of the recreational immunity statute.

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